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6 Surprising Things About Retirement Homes In Raleigh

 portrait of senior friends at home together

A lot of seniors don’t know what to expect before moving into a retirement community. Many may have negative views toward them, based more on myth than reality. Those seniors that do look into retirement communities are often surprised to find how different they are from the stereotypes.

Here are a few of the benefits you might not expect to find when you move into a Raleigh retirement community, like Cambridge Village of Apex, North Carolina.

Things You Don’t Know Until You Move into a Raleigh, NC, Retirement Community

They’re Often More Affordable Than Living on Your Own

A lot of seniors assume they can’t afford rent in a retirement community. However, with the regular expenses eliminated or lessened by living in a retirement community, many residents pay less than they did living alone. Your rent will also include amenities like the fitness center and clubhouse.

Retirement Communities Make Life Easier

Many don’t consider all the chores that will fall away when you are a resident in a retirement community. You can put regular home and lawn maintenance in the past and focus more on your hobbies.

There’s a Full Schedule of Events

Living in a retirement community doesn’t need to mean sitting around bored all day. Modern communities keep tenants busy with daily activities, like shopping, crafts, exercise classes, and trips.

Retirement Communities are Spacious

A lot of older people don’t want to give up their spacious homes to move into cramped studios. Modern retirement communities are built with comfort in mind. With spacious, multi-room floor plans for different budgets, outdoor walking areas, and common spaces, there’s plenty of room to spread out.

You’ll Meet New Friends

It can be difficult leaving people in your current neighborhood, but it is easy to make new friends in a senior living community. You’ll be surrounded by people your age, who have had similar experiences to you. Regular activities also provide a great opportunity to meet different people.

Most Have On-Site Fitness Amenities

Modern retirement homes feature fitness centers made with the needs of older individuals in mind. They also offer a variety of classes geared around different health and mobility issue. Certain communities take relaxation and health even further with spa offerings, like saunas and massage.

Excellent retirement communities, like Cambridge Village of Apex, near Raleigh, North Carolina, can help you get the most out of your housing budget. Schedule a tour at Cambridge Village of Apex and see what surprises it has for you.

Tips for Choosing Which Dogs Are Ideal for Seniors

Elderly woman with an elderly dog

Nothing compares to the unconditional love of a dog. Living in a retirement community doesn’t mean you can’t have a dog to come home to, but how do you choose your next canine companion?

It may be tempting to choose the cutest dog you see at the animal shelter or go with a breed you used to have. However, with lower energy and limited mobility, seniors have new considerations to take into account when choosing their furry friends.

Choose the Right Dog for a Senior Lifestyle

Owning a dog comes with mental, emotional, and physical benefits for seniors. Dogs offer consistent friendship and encourage seniors to walk more. However, no two dogs are exactly alike, and some are much better suited for older individuals.

Here are three things to consider when choosing a dog for seniors.

Age

Few things are cuter than a fuzzy little puppy, but owning a puppy comes with lots of responsibilities. Puppies are high-energy and need to be trained for home living. You can expect a lot of chewing, accidents, and jumping as they grow up. For those reasons, puppies demand more attention than most seniors can provide.

Older dogs are a much better match to the lifestyles of older individuals. Adult dogs, especially senior dogs, are already mellowed out. Most older dogs have already been trained, eliminating that chore from your life.

Size

Maybe you’ve owned labradors or Great Danes your whole life. You might just prefer larger breeds. Unfortunately, bigger dogs become a lot harder to manage as you age. Sometimes larger dogs can knock seniors over, making them potentially dangerous.

Smaller breeds, like pugs or terriers, are easier to control and even pick up. You can also comfortably sit with your companion in your lap as you watch tv or read.

Temperament

Different breeds have different temperaments, so elders need to take care to choose the breed that best fits their energy level. Some high-energy breeds like border collies, shepherds, and other herding and sporting dogs may require more play time than you’re able to provide.

Slower breeds, like bulldogs, schnauzers, and chins are excellent companions for older adults.

Dogs are Welcome at Cambridge Village of Apex

Make sure to spend lots of time with any dog you are considering before you buy. Even within one breed, every dog has their own distinct personality. Find the one that best meshes with you. Go on test walks and take the time to play with your next friend before you bring them home.

Living with your canine companion is just one of the things that make Cambridge Village of Apex, North Carolina, feel like home. Request a brochure or contact us at (919) 363-2080 to learn more about what makes Cambridge Village a great place to live.

How Retirement Communities Are Adapting to Improve Senior Health

senior man and women with fitness trainer in gym lifting barbells as sport exercise

Health and fitness problems are a growing concern for seniors. Baby boomers are retiring in poorer health than the previous generation. Despite some positive changes, like decreases in smoking, other issues like obesity are seeing increases, according to a 2016 United Health Foundation Report.

Retirement communities are facing the challenge of poor senior health head on. Innovative fitness programs are helping older people improve their physical and general well-being.

How Retirement Communities Are Combatting Poor Senior Health

Benton House- Ageless Grace

Mobility is a major limiting factor for many seniors. Older adults who no longer have the ability to stand often become discouraged from exercising. This was one of the concerns the Ageless Grace program at Benton House exists to address.

Ageless Grace uses 21 seated exercises to get people moving and exercising to music. By using music and memory, Ageless Grace works the mind as well. The program is particularly helpful for residents with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.

CareOne- Forever Fit

The Forever Fit program at CareOne is a holistic approach to health and fitness for seniors. Non-traditional offerings, like yoga, massage therapy, meditation, and physiotherapy, help with emotional health as well as physical. By focusing on other measures of health, Forever Fit encourages an overall feeling of well-being, making it easier to stick to the program.

Forever Fit recognizes that seniors have different levels of fitness. The program can be adapted based on mobility and strength levels. Individualization continues into every aspect of the program. Residents get one-on-one time to consult with dietitians, physiologists, and physical trainers.

Cambridge Village of Apex, NC- Healthworks Fitness

Adaptability is also a part of what makes Healthworks Fitness a successful program. Residents can sign up for personal training programs built around their unique situations. The Healthworks Fitness Center also offers group exercise classes, adding a social element to fitness.

Cambridge Village of Apex, North Carolina, also focuses on relaxation as a part of a more holistic approach to health. Members of Healthworks can enjoy the steam room or whirlpool. Seniors can also take advantage of spa services, like back, head, and facial massage.

With a renewed focus on fitness, communities like Cambridge Village of Apex, North Carolina, prove aging doesn’t mean accepting poor health. Learn more about our fitness facilities by scheduling a tour or calling us at (919) 363-2080.

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